Martin amongst the bluebells

Martin amongst the bluebells

Martin amongst the bluebells

Not for sale

I have developed a style of environmental portraiture that I call '360-degree' portraits. I take 6–12 photographs of a person and ask them to rotate in a circle, as if they are at the centre of a clock. We rotate together through 360-degrees and I combine the shots in Photoshop.

Like when you shoot with a shallow depth of field, the processing helps remove distractions from a picture and keeps the viewer focussed on the subject. But what I particularly like about the technique is that the background is still there — it's not blurred out of all recognition. For example, urban shots still look like they were taken in a town, and interior shots still look like they were taken in a room. You get the subject and the environment but the environment doesn't distract from the subject like you would get if you shot at f/8.

I like the way that the blending technique leaves artefacts around the subject's body and so shows multiple views of the person. If I was writing an artist statement, I might even argue that it's a little post-modern, because you don't have a single perspective or 'truth' but acknowledge that people have multiple identities.

Martin amongst the bluebells

Canon 5D Mk 3 with EF 35mm f/2. Multiple images. 1/200s, f/4, ISO 100.

Collection

This work is from the collection, 'Experimental'

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